July 2019 Goals : The Year of 1% Better

books, catholicism, goals, reading, running, year of 1% better

If you’re new here, I declared 2019 the Year of 1% Better. Here’s a list of all previous goal posts.

January: Goals | Outcomes

February: Goals | Outcomes

March: Goals | Outcomes

April : Goals | Outcomes

May : Goals  | Outcomes

June : Goals | Outcomes 

I wanted to write this up yesterday, but Henry was not too keen on the idea of taking naps during the day. Nor was he too keen on sleeping this morning, but I guess that is to be expected from a one month old! So quickly — before he wakes up now, I’ll share my goals for July.

This month feels chaotic. We move next week Friday, so even though I’ve been working on class prep, I also have been packing and organizing. I donated a large amount of clothing and books. We do not want to bring a lot of furniture down, so we have someone taking our dining room table and couches so we can begin again. Even still, I have a few things I would like to work on for this month.

Begin to run again. I plan on easing into this. I’ve been consistent with my walks, but I’d like to slowly start adding some running to those walks. I started on Tuesday — I walked four minutes, ran a minute. I felt ok. It felt very clear to me that it had been a long time since I’ve run, but I also did not experience any pain during or after. It was just uncomfortable. Slowly, I plan on adding on to the minutes, but for now for three of my weekly walks I would like to add some running time. 

Read a chapter of a book non-work related daily. A lot of my reading lately has been in preparation for the fall, mainly American history. But I want to make sure I get in some fun reading too. Ideally, this year I would like to read one novel and one nonfiction every month, but that might be a little much for me to start on. For now – just a chapter a day. I’m currently reading Isabella: Warrior Queen right now. I don’t know much about the Spanish monarchs, but this has proved to be very interesting.

Daily Angelus. I’m pretty good at morning prayers (well, at least when Henry is napping). I have some coffee and that is usually the first part of the day. The rest of the day is usually iffy. I’ve tried to incorporate more throughout the day (like a daily rosary), but I can never keep up with it. Here’s to starting small — this month I’d like to say an Angelus later in the day either around noon or later in the afternoon.

Once again — just some small things. I think preparing for teach has provided me with a great deal of my goals and to-do’s for now. I’m really excited about teaching this fall, so that is fine. But as usual — I do want to make sure I have a few things to work on.

What are your goals for this month?

 

 

Advertisements

A Review of The Common Rule: Habits of Purpose for an Age of Distraction by Justin Whitmeal Earley

books, catholicism

Contains Amazon affiliate links. 

thecommonrule

It is probably Earley’s misfortune that I read The Common Rule at the same time I have been reading Francis de Sales’ Introduction to the Devout Life. The latter makes the former seem incredibly shallow. I will try to be fair, because I do think if you are the type of person who does have a chaotic, out-of-control life, maybe Earley’s book can provide a beginning place for you — milk before meat for beginners and all that.

After an anxious breakdown Earley creates a rule of life to bring peace for himself and his family. While eating dinner with friends, he vows to practice this rule, determining that limits are the key to freedom. He writes, “I had lived my whole life thinking that all limits ruin freedom, when all along it’s been the opposite: the right limits create freedom.”

It is a Christian book and most of Earley’s advice revolves around ways Christianity and the Bible can help us with bringing order to life. He divides the rules into eight daily and weekly habits — a daily example being kneeling at prayer, weekly one hour of conversation with a friend. The appendix contains how to ascribe some of these rules to different walks of life — for parents, addicts, artists. I thought this was a good idea — one size does not fit everyone.

None of his rules are objectionable. Most — like scripture before phone in the mornings, curating tv to four hours a week — are very good ideas. Also — they are measurable for someone who just wants to try something, anything to make life feel better and more manageable. Sometimes I think advice can seem so vague, but the actionable nature of Earley’s rule I think could be really helpful.

Here is what I had a problem with and I say this tentatively: I am not too keen on the self-helpification of Christianity.

Take habit no. 3 – one hour with phone off (which is small potatoes to any Cal Newport reader). Earley writes about the importance of presence in life — we learn this with the creation and salvation stories. Turning off the phone gives us more time with children, but it also has another important benefit — you can get more done at work! And get into the state of flow! Of course — this is true. But I don’t exactly know what this has to do with living a Christian life. I didn’t realize the point of Christ was to help me be more productive, but ok.

I’m being snarky and perhaps even nit-picky. Still — Jesus is not your self-help guru. I love self-help books. I love books on productivity, I’m not sure the point of living in accordance with the Gospel is to become more productive.

I do not not recommend this book, but after reading it I suggest picking up something else, like a secular book on the same subject (7 Habits, being my favorite) or if living a better Christian life is what you want, pick up Introduction to the Devout Life. It is a good starting point, maybe, but even at that it is lackluster.

Thoughts on the Burning of the Notre Dame

catholicism, daily life

Bruno and I spent five days in Paris during our honeymoon. Living that graduate student stipend life, we spent five nights in what was basically a tiny attic converted to an apartment four blocks away from the Notre Dame. We arrived in the evening and after dinner at a local cafe, we walked to the famed cathedral. It was our first and most frequented stop during the entire trip.

I knew I wanted to see it — I grew up watching the Hunchback of Notre Dame over and over (side note: how was this ever a children’s movie?). But I do not think I expected it to startle me in the way it did. I could not get over the church’s beauty and how overpowering the whole structure felt. I had goosebumps. I cried. It was like my eyes could not feast enough on the church. We walked around and I exclaimed over the flying buttresses and we sat at a cafe, close enough so I could keep looking, enjoying drinks before we walked back to our attic.

57429748_438734816938104_2069486032587325440_n

56927150_362787004444955_7601185785626230784_n

Every day we stopped by the cathedral. On Sunday we went to mass and I was filled with wonder again. I could not — and still cannot — get over the fact that men, people living and breathing just like me, made this over two hundred years. It made me feel small, but also a part of something larger and greater. Here I am, a mere student, but also a Catholic, a true lover of Western Civilization and everything it stands for, appreciating one of its greatest accomplishments. I prayed to God and took holy communion in the same church many have done before me since the 13th century.

56960640_402557160322674_7335003259016314880_n

I was checking the Boston Marathon results after CrossFit when I saw the Notre Dame was on fire. Marathon forgotten I checked to see if it were true. I cannot blame pregnancy hormones for how much I cried over that church yesterday. I love the Notre Dame and I love what it stands for. I hate throwing around words like “awe” and “sublime,” but there I felt those things. There I physically felt the sense of something greater. It devastated me to know that it will never be the same.

I’ll admit now I feel angry. As everyone mourns (and Macron claims it will be rebuilt), I want to point out this cathedral has been neglected for years. After visiting Paris and the experience I had at the Notre Dame, I learned how little money the church had to keep up with repairs. I learned that the Friends of Notre Dame frequently went to Americans for help with upkeep.

I can only suspect this comes from taking the cathedral for granted the way western civilization as a whole is taken for granted. I cannot help but feel frustrated with those who see the damage done to the Notre Dame as a great loss, but do not connect that to the loss and negligence of the culture that helped to create such a structure.